amputation

In an effort to balance working hard with playing hard, I once took a red-eye flight back from Whistler to New York City after a big ski trip and went straight to my office where I spent a long day managing a hedge fund. By the time I hopped on the subway to head home, I was so exhausted that I lost my balance while I was exiting the train. I fell between cars, landed on the tracks, and my lower right leg was crushed beneath a wheel. I had to have a below-the-knee amputation as a result.

That was 17 years ago, and since then, I’ve undergone over 20 surgeries and seven blood transfusions—my most recent hospitalization was this past summer. At first, it was a struggle for me to walk just one city block—I didn’t have the muscular endurance or cardiovascular strength to support the prosthetic leg.

I was so tired and just felt defeated. But finally, one day, I remember thinking: Today’s the day. I’m going to try to walk farther and do it without a struggle. That’s when it finally clicked. I started walking on the treadmill, trying to imitate other people’s gait.

The first time, I was drenched with sweat and had tears streaming down my face from the pain after only 10 minutes. But I kept walking and added hills to strengthen my glutes, and eventually I could walk at 15 percent incline for an hour and a half. I was walking better and could feel myself getting stronger—and I loved it.

Source: ‘After My Leg Was Amputated, I Found Joy Through Fitness’ – Women’s Health

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